Introduction

This is the place to discuss the fate of the Frog moulds.
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wannsee
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Introduction

Unread postby wannsee » Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:30 am

Spending a lot of the year in the Ukraine I have been lucky enough to visit a few of the factories that used the former Frog moulds. As is well documented the only Aircraft that came to the former Soviet Union were allied subjects. A lot of the Luftwaffe Aircraft have been released by Revell and seem to do the rounds from time to time. What caught my interest was the fate of the V-Bombers as well as other subjects. Where are they now?

One story is that they were lost at sea on the way to New Zealand. I have heard this from various sources but have never been given any details. If I can get a rough date I will search the Lloyds register as they hold details of all shipping losses plus the manifests.

I would like to publish a list of all the moulds that exist on the website. I am also talking to the owner of the Novo site to see if we can get an English version of his research into the fate of the moulds.

I would welcome the views of our forum on this subject.

So it is over to you........
Za naszą i waszą wolność For our freedom and yours

Digs6

Re: Introduction

Unread postby Digs6 » Sun Jul 31, 2011 6:34 am

Well I for one would be fascinated to know more!

Paul

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Re: Introduction

Unread postby Bob(K) » Sun Jul 31, 2011 9:44 am

I too would be interested. Where did the Matchbox Victor mould come from?

Bob

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wannsee
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Re: Introduction

Unread postby wannsee » Sun Jul 31, 2011 10:22 am

The Frog V-Bomber range was in 1/96 scale. I believe the Matchbox Victor was 1/72. Frog V-bombers go for big money on Ebay. I know I got one a couple of years ago and that cost me £150.00 quid......
Za naszą i waszą wolność For our freedom and yours

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Re: Introduction

Unread postby lancfan » Sun Jul 31, 2011 2:20 pm

The Matchbox 1/72 victor K.2 was a new Matchbox tooling and can still be found in a Revell box.
I would love to know what happened to the various tools, where they are now and if they are still serviceable- and when we can expect to see the various kits again.

David.
If it is broken then fix it but if it isn't- LEAVE IT ALONE!
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Re: Introduction

Unread postby NOVOkits » Wed Aug 24, 2011 7:55 am


essezman

Re: Introduction

Unread postby essezman » Thu Sep 29, 2011 9:31 am

I would like to know too.
The survival of so much of the range is a tribute to the original choices.

Apart from the V bombers wasnt there a Lancaster (and Wellington ?) in 1/96?

Reading about a Typhoon with no pilot brought back memories. So if thats still going.....and the Attacker (15 parts?)

What happened to the Boston/Havoc,Beaufighters(incl MK21).Mosquito(superior to the then Airfix,The Fokker xx1,Lysander,Albacore,TBM1,Mitchell,P47.P51,Spitfire & VI....and the Spitrire with no pilot or seat.

Apart from Novo and other Russiam Cos, a thanks to Revell..

(....and I wish I d bought a Wadham ambulance)

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Re: Introduction

Unread postby N113 fan » Tue May 29, 2012 7:18 pm

The Frog kit of the Vulcan has gone missing and is subject to legend or myth, so good luck if you can find out what happened in New Zealand. The other Vulcan kit in question is very much alive and well and comes from the American company of Lindberg. I think you can order them from the States along with the other kit the HP Victor both to 1/96. The Lindberg Vulcan kit is of the prototype VX777 and it was typical for the time in having moving control surfaces on the wing and tail all very toy like. The original boxing of the HP Victor had a complicated moving control incorporating the flying surfaces and an output through the stand to a small joy stick. However the construction of the kit was so challenging this idea was dropped and in recent mouldings the joystick and control rods were removed but you still have moving flaps on the wing and moving rudder on the tail which was left to move. For the Vulcan you can tell it was the prototype with the straight edges to the wing and the Frog model was a Vulcan B1 with decals for XA891 which crashed due to an electrical failure near Hull during an engine test in the late fifties. Happily for the crew they all survived the accident. You can tell it is a Vulcan B1 by the extensions to the wing of the service aircraft, however XA891 was a Olympus trials aircraft at the time of the crash.
Revell either got hold of the Lindberg moulds on loan or hire and produced and boxed their own version of the Lindberg Vulcan and Victor kit or ordered directly from Lindberg a quantity of kits in poly-bags. Which were put into Revell boxes and had Revell instructions printed. Reviewers at the time commented the box was good but the models were pretty poor for Revell kits. The kits are currently on Lindberg list for sale but are now stated as being 1/100 scale which is wrong.

Vulcan_images.jpg
Two Vulcan kits one made by Frog in the UK and the other Lindberg made in the USA
Vulcan_images.jpg (31.83 KiB) Viewed 7718 times


If you want to do more with the Lindberg Vulcan the issue of Scale Models for August 1975 has an article on converting the Lindberg kit by D Jane from page 393 into a Vulcan B2. The article has a large drawing on the centre fold of the wing and tail of the Vulcan.

What also could have happened (just my opinion though)

I would also like to add to the conspiracy theory as I have in the past been employed with an engineering company that paid for moulds to be made in Asia. The Asian mould maker we found to be very resourceful and would quiet often take a piece of tooling i.e. the mould and reuse it for another job. They would do this for two main reasons. Firstly they could save on money as they did not have to buy in new metal for a new project. Secondary they could claim that if a job was to be repeated after some time had past, say a few years then the tool would need to be re-made and a price paid for doing it again. The ownership of the moulds could become quiet fluid and from time to time the moulds would just disappear. So the moulds if they reached Hong Kong could have been stolen or the recipient company could just have decided that they could get away with recycling the moulds. It really does depend on who was placing the orders for the kits, how often they ordered the kits and how close they were to what was happening at the sub contractors. I think it would be more likely that the moulds were sent to a jobbing plastic mould company and who knows may be sitting on a shelf today. But giving the cost of the metal for high quality moulds I do not think they would be sitting around for long. Also if the sub contract company thought that the parent company had gone out of business, then finders keepers. This is if the moulds reached Asia at all. The scrap value also would be high you cannot use any old steel for high pressure moulding.

The other complication is the size of the moulds where they for an automatic moulding machine or semi-automatic or did a worker have to reach into the mould and take the hot plastic moulding out. May be the deal included the moulding machines as well. It does not follow that the transfer was straight forward and may be the tools had to be modified in some way to fit into the new sub contract companies machines.
(Frank Spencer, repeating) There are old pilots and bold pilots

(Frank, confused) There are no old bald pilots

(Flight instructor, annoyed) No Mr Spencer no old Bold pilots !!

(quote : Frank Spencer, Xmas special, TV show Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em)

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Re: Introduction

Unread postby N113 fan » Sat Dec 07, 2013 12:15 pm

It has been a while but I am a bit slow at digging out information these days. However I think that this information should go on record here:

On doing a search on Tri-ang Pedigree on the forum site Britmodeller I found a rather intrepid modeller post on building a HP Victor B1 from Linberg. However the chat spread on to the Frog Victor and its ultimate demise and this information from a member called Neil Lambess the post was made in Oct 2008.

He has reported that the moulds in New Zealand were all scrapped under the ownership of Lincoln (NZ) company. His source of this information was from an Ex Lincoln traveller.

His words: "The moulds were eventually sold to Lincoln NZ but never re-issued , the "legend' is that they fell off a ship en-route to Hong Kong , but ive met a ex- traveller for Lincoln who told me they were sold for scrap metal when Lincoln was going belly up in NZ.... along with the DH110 , the English Electric p1 the Scimitar and many many others."

Britmodeller- Aircraft modelling - Millitary modelling discussion by era - Cold War

By Martin Hale post Sep 25 2008.
(Frank Spencer, repeating) There are old pilots and bold pilots

(Frank, confused) There are no old bald pilots

(Flight instructor, annoyed) No Mr Spencer no old Bold pilots !!

(quote : Frank Spencer, Xmas special, TV show Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em)


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